The Muse in Contemporary Art

As defined in the previous blog, the muse is a person who is the source of creative inspiration for artists. Artists are attracted to some special quality that they alone may notice. In both the female artist and male artist, these traits often spark creativity, imagination, inspiration and often leads to obsession. In Greek mythology…

The Muse in Pre-Modern Art

Let us consider the muse in pre-modern art. In previous blogs we have addressed; the succubi and incubus in art, the siren and piren, the mermaid and mermen and the prostitute in art. This blog continues that approach. The use of the muse in contemporary art will be considered in the next blog. A few…

Prostitutes in Art

From Sirens and Pirens, we move on to their surrogates, the prostitutes. Muses will be considered in a future blog. Both prostitutes and muses have been and are still subjects for the visual artist. When society requires a more realistic substitute for the succubus, incubus, siren or piren, they often substitute the prostitute. In the…

Making of ‘Homage to Women’ a Two Dimensional Sculpture

The thought process and construction process leading to artworks are often unstated or understated. The understanding of the purpose and meaning of an art piece is often left up to the art critic or a curator. To avoid a misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the art piece, #1-94 Homage to Women referenced in this blog, the…

Neglected Women in History and Science

As suggested in the previous blog ‘Forgotten Women in Art History’ there were women prodigies and woman geniuses in all categories of study. They were often neglected in the history of man. Intelligence is gender neutral. Early Greeks and Romans recognized and recorded the ability of women, but mostly in poetry and on occasions in…

Forgotten Women in Art History

Yes there were women prodigies and woman geniuses; the problem is they were seldom recorded in the history of man. Even prehistoric man had their women geniuses. Who do you think developed the use of fire? The making of Paleolithic art and early children art are gender neutral. Early Greeks and Romans recognized and recorded…