Van Gogh landscape to be shown for first time in 100 years

Experts expect Le Moulin d’Alphonse to fetch around $10m after research tying it directly to the artist via the records of his sister-in-law Johanna author Dayla Alberge | March 9, 2015 | via The Guardian A landscape by Vincent van Gogh is to be exhibited for the first time in more than 100 years following the…

the loss of faith made music mute

Oliver Rudland |  STANDPOINT. | March 2015 It is a mystery to many people why so few contemporary classical composers seem capable of writing “a good tune”. Surely, given the number of students who pursue composition in our universities and conservatoires, and the hugely increased access which technologies such as music-notation software give to prospective composers, we…

the conflicting values of self-criticism

“We may not be able to imagine a life in which we don’t spend a large amount of our time criticising ourselves and others; but we should keep in mind the self-love that is always in play. Self-criticism can be our most unpleasant – our most sadomasochistic – way of loving ourselves.” Against Self-Criticism | Adam…

the Ajanta Caves: discovering lost treasure

The Ajanta Caves were a sanctuary for Buddhist monks that was forgotten, along with its stunning riches, for nearly 1,500 years. Jonathan Glancey investigates. The Ajanta Caves, 30 spellbinding Buddhist prayer halls and monasteries carved, as if by sorcery, into a horseshoe-shaped rock face in a mountainous region of India’s Maharashtra state, 450km (280 miles)…

police arrest brothers who sold a fake Goya … and were paid with fake cash

article by Lorena Muñoz-Alonso |  artnet news | February 23, 2015 Spanish Police have arrested two brothers from Girona, Spain, who attempted to sell a fake Francisco de Goya painting to a purported sheikh, EFE reports. But the “sheikh” was no victim: he paid the pair with photocopied money. The con artists realized they had been…

down and dirty fairy tales

How this rediscovered stash of darker-than-Grimm stories destroys our Prince Charming myths The translator of a newly discovered trove of 150-year-old tales on the gender-bending surprises found there article by Laura Miller | via Salon In 2012, readers around the world were intrigued to learn that a researcher in northern Bavaria had discovered hundreds of…

Pablo Picasso: Spanish by birth, French at art

The 20th century’s greatest painter was born in Malaga but came into his own amid the sleaze and bohemianism of Paris – the only city that could have matched his peerless imagination article by Jonathan Jones | The Guardian | 20 February 2015 Pablo Picasso, the greatest artist of the 20th century, was French. Hold on ……

why museums hide masterpieces away

article by Kimberly Bradley | BBC Culture | 23 January 2015 | featured image: Many museums and galleries maintain vast facilities to store works not on public display (picture courtesy of Montel) In major museums around the world, some truly great works of art are hidden away from public view. What are they – and why…

fame finally comes to little-known Renaissance master Piero di Cosimo

by Stanley Meisler | LA Times | February 14, 2015 | featured image: Piero di Cosimo’s “The Discovery of Honey,” c. 1500, oil on panel When American millionaires bought paintings by Piero di Cosimo in the late 19th century, almost all the works were attributed to other Italian Renaissance artists. Piero, a painter of Florence during…

indonesian cave art may be world’s oldest

A new study dates these Indonesian handprints to at least 40,000 years old article by Ann Gibbons | 8 October 2014 | Science Magazine | featured image via Independent UK The world’s oldest cave art may not lie in Europe but rather halfway around the globe in Indonesia, according to a new study of the long-known art. But some…

how learning artistic skills alters the brain

New research finds neural changes not only reflecting increased technical capacities, but also enhanced creativity. Article by Tom Jacobs |  February 11, 2015 | Pacific Standard Mag Are artists born, or made? At the end of Woody Allen’s great comedy Bullets Over Broadway, the John Cusack character concludes that, in spite of his desire and effort,…

the magic in twilight

‘Water and Shadow’ at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts engenders a renewed appreciation for the emotional range printmakers can achieve. article by LEE LAWRENCE | via Wall Street Journal Water and Shadow: Kawase Hasui and Japanese Landscape Prints Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Through March 29 An island silhouetted in the moonlight, yellow grasses drying…